‘Quit notice to Igbo security threat, crime against the Nigerian State”.

UMUAHIA—OHANEZE Ndigbo Youth Council, OYC, has reacted angrily to the quit-the-North order given to Ndigbo by a coalition of Northern Youth groups, describing it as a “security threat and a crime against the Nigerian State”.

 

The coalition, including Arewa Citizens Action for Change, Arewa Youths Consultative Forum, Arewa Youths Development Foundation, Arewa Students Forum, Northern Emancipation Network, Northern Youths Stakeholders, among others, in what they called “Kaduna Declaration”, also called on Northern to leave Igbo land. Reacting to the action of the Northern youths Council urged Igbos in the North to “to stay put wherever they were across the country” and “to defend themselves in the event of any provocation and attack from Arewa Youths”. A statement issued by the President of Ohaneze Youths Council, Mazi Okechukwu Isiguzoro condemned the action of the Northern Youths and warned them to immediately reverse their position. According to Isiguzoro, “the ultimatum was a call for war and should be treated as such by security agents”, urging security agencies not overlook the threat. “They are on it again and this is a sad reminder of the civil war. This is how it started as a joke and before we knew it, a coordinated and simultaneous attack was launched against the Igbos in the North. “This is a sad development considering efforts being made to unite this country; this is a sad commentary considering the sacrifices Igbos have made in this country. “We, however, wish to state unequivocally that Igbos are not cowards. We are not afraid of Alhaji AbdulAziz Suleiman, Yerima Shetimma and their cohorts. “Ndigbo want to make it categorically clear that we are ready for them; we are cannot be intimidated by their ranting. The era of taking properties belonging to Ndigbo by force is gone. We won’t let that happen again. “To this end, we are calling on our people in the North not to shift any ground; they should remain where they are; this country belongs to all of us. Any attack on our people shall receive commensurate reaction”, OYC warned. OYC however, urged Northern Governors and the Northern Elders to call their youths to order and dissociate themselves from the threat on the Igbos, saying “failure to do so, we will take it that they are all equal partners to the threat”. “This is a drum of war coming from the North and should the Northern leaders fail to act accordingly, we shall be left with no option than to go beyond this stage. “We call on the Northern traditional and religious leaders headed by the Sultan of Sokoto to assure Igbos of their safety in the 19 Northern States. “We are calling on the President General Arewa Consultative Forum to call Northern Youths to order; they must be compelled to tender unreserved apology to Ndigbo‎ and stop fanning the embers of disunity among Nigerians. “‎We will not leave the North for the Northern Youths after developing the North with assets and business investment worth over N44 trillion. If they are preparing ground for abandoned properties, they have failed. “May we all call on security agencies to provide protection to all the Igbos in the 19 Northern States and their properties? Anything on the contrary means giving a backing to this orchestrated genocidal plot against Igbos. “May we call on the Federal Government to assure Ndigbo that they are part of this country, by living up to expectations of protecting their lives and properties. Failure to do so, we shall be left with no option than to defend ourselves. “We also call for the immediate arrest of Yerima and his group; this is a crime against the State and it should not be treated with levity. “Rather than chase around un-armed Biafran agitators, the DSS should go after these men who have declared war on the Nigeria State. “In the meantime, our people should be careful and vigilant. They should not hesitate to report any assault on them. We are watching and waiting”, OYC further said.

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Literature-In-English JAMB SYLLABUS – 2017/18

GENERAL OBJECTIVES

The aim of the Unified Tertiary Matriculation Examination (UTME) syllabus in Literature in English is to prepare the candidates for the Board’s examination. It is designed to test their achievement of the course objectives, which are to:
1.Stimulate and sustain their interest in Literature in English;
2.Create an awareness of the general principles and functions of language;
3.Appreciate literary works of all genres and across all cultures;
4.Apply the knowledge of Literature in English to the analysis of social, political and economic events in the society.

DETAILED SYLLABUS

TOPICS/CONTENTS/NOTES
1. DRAMA
a. Types:
i.      Tragedy
ii.      Comedy
iii.     Tragicomedy
iv.     Melodrama
v.      Farce

b. Dramatic Techniques
i.     Characterisation
ii.     Dialogue
iii.    Flashback
iv.    Mime
v.     Costume
vi.    Music/Dance
vii.   Décor
viii.  Acts/Scenes
ix.   Soliloquy/aside etc.
c.  Interpretation of the PrescribedTexts
i.     Theme
ii.     Plot
iii.    Socio-political context

OBJECTIVES
Candidates should be able to:

i. identify the various types  of drama;
ii. analyse  the  contents  of  the various types of drama;
iii. compare and contrast the features of different dramatic types;
iv. demonstrate adequate knowledge of dramatic techniques used in each prescribed text;
v. differentiate between  styles of  selected playwrights;
vi. determine  the  theme  of  any prescribed text;
vii. identify the plot of the play;
viii. apply the lessons of the play to everyday living.

TOPICS/CONTENTS/NOTES
2.   PROSE
a. Types:
i.  Fiction
•   Novel
•   Novella
•   Short story
.
ii. Non-fiction
•   Biography
•   Autobiography
•   Memoir
b. Narrative Techniques/Devices:
i.   Point of view
•    Omni scent/ThirdPerson
•   First Person
ii: Setting
•   Temporal
•   Spatial/Geographical
iii. Characterisation
•   Round characters   .
•   Flat characters
iv. Language use

c. Textual Analysise
i. Theme
ii. Plot
iii. Socio-political context;

OBJECTIVES
Candidates should be able to:

i. differentiate between types of prose;
ii. identify the category that each  prescribed text belongs to;
iii. analyse  the  components  of  each type of prose;
iv. identify the narrative techniques used in each of the prescribed texts;
v. determine an author’s narrative style;
vi. distinguish between one type of character from another,
vii. determine the thematic pre- occupation of the author  of the prescribed text;
viii. indicate the plot of the novel;
ix.  relate the prescribed text to real life situations.

TOPICS/CONTENTS/NOTES
3.    POETRY
a. Types:
i.   Sonnet
ii.   Ode
iii.  Lyrics
iv.  Elegy
v.   Ballad
vi.  Panegyric
vii. Epic
viii. Blank Verse
b. PoeticDevices
i.   Sructure
ii.   Imagery
iii.  Rhyme/Rhythm
iv.   Diction
v.    Personal
c. Appreciation.
i.       Thematic preoccupation
ii.      Socio-political relevance

OBJECTIVES
Candidates should be able to:

i.   identify   different   types   of   poetry;
ii.   compare and contrast features of different  poetic types:
iii.  determine the devices used by various poets;

iv. show how poetic devices are usedfor aesthetic effect in each poem;
v.  deduce the poet’s preoccupation from the poem;
vi. appraise poetry as an art with moral values;
vii. apply the lessons from the poem to real life situations.

TOPICS/CONTENTS/NOTES
4. GENERAL LITERACY PRINCIPLES
a. Literary terms:
foreshadowing, suspense, theatre, monoloque, dialoque, soliloquy, symbolism, protagonist, ntagonist, figures of speech, satire, stream of consciousness etc, in addition to those listed above under the different genres.
b. Relationship between literary terms and principles.

OBJECTIVE
Candidates should be able to:

i.  identify literary terms in drama, prose and poetry;
ii. differentiate between literaryterms and principles;
iii. use literary terms appropriately.

TOPICS/CONTENTS/NOTES
5. LITERARY APPRECIATION
Unseen passage/extracts from Drama, Prose and Poetry.

OBJECTIVES
Candidates should be able to:

i.  determine literary devices used in a given passage/extract;
ii.  provide a meaningful inter- pretation of the given
passage/extract;
iii. relate the extract to true life experiences.

Literature in English
A LIST OF SELECTED AFRICAN AND NON-AFRICAN PLAYS, NOVELS AND POEMS
DRAMA:
African:
i.       JC De Craft: Sons and Daughters, UPL Non-African:
i.      William Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet, Newswan POETRY:
African:
i.       Buchi Emecheta: The Joys of Motherhood, Heinemann
ii.      Ferdinand Oyono: The Old Man and the Medal, Heinenmann
Non-African:
George Orwell: Nineteen Eighty Four, Newswan
POETRY:
African:
i.  Adeoti Gbemisola: ‘Naked Soles’
ii. D. Rubadiri: ‘An African Thunderstorm’
iii.Kobcna Eyi Acquah: ‘In the novel of the Soul’
iv.Mazisi Kunene: ‘Heritage of Liberation’
v. Okinba Launko: ‘End of the War’
vi.Traditional: ‘Give me the Minstrel’s Seat’
Non-African:
i.       Andrew Mabel: ‘To His Coy Mistress’
ii.      D.H.Lawrence: ‘Bat’
iii.     T. S. Elliot: ‘The Journey of the Magi’
iv.     Wendy Cope: ‘Sonnet’

Literature in English
RECOMMENDED TEXTS
1.ANTHOLOGIES
Gbemisola, A. (2005) Naked Soles, Ibadan Kraft
Eruvbctine, A. E. ct al (1991) Poetry for Secondary Schools, Lagos: Longman
Hayward. J. (cd.) (1968) The Penguin Book of English Verse, London Penguin Johnson, R. et al (eds.) (1996) New Poetry from Africa, Ibadan: UP Pic
Kermode, F. et al (1964) Oxford Anthology of English Literature, Vol. II,
London: OUP
Launko, O. (1987) Minted Coins, Ibadan: Heinemann
Senanu, K. E. and Vincent* T. (eds.) (1993) A Selection of African Poetry,
Lagos: Longman
Sonyinka, W. (ed.) (1987) Poems of Black Africa, Ibadan: Heinemann
Wendy Cope (1986) Making Cocoa for Kingsley Amis, London: Faber and
Faber

WAEC Literature-in-English Syllabus for 2016-2020

WAEC LITERATURE SYLLABUS FOR 2016-2020

*Unseen Drama
Williams Shakespeare: Othello

*African Prose
Amma Darko: Faceless
Bayo Adebowale: Lonely Days

*Non-African Prose
Richard Wright: Native Son
Patience Swift: The Last Goodman

*Non-African Drama
Oliver Goldsmith: She Stoops to Conquer
Lorraine Hansberry: A Raisin in the Sun

*African Drama
Frank Ogodo Ogbeche: Harvest of Corruption
Dele Charley: The Blood of a Stranger

*African Poetry
Birago Diop: Vanity
Gbemisola Adeoti: Ambush
Gabriel Okara: Piano and Drums
Gbanabam Hallowell: The Dinning Table
Lenrie Peter: The Panic of Growing Older
Kofi Awoonor: The Anvil and the Hammer

*Non-African Poetry
Alfred Tennyson: Crossing the Bar
George Herbert: The Pulley
William Blake: The School Boy
William Morris: The Proud King
Robert Frost Birches: Birches
Williams Shakespeare: Shall I compare thee to a Summer’s Day?

Literature in English Syllabus from JAMB

The aim of this 2016/2017 Unified Tertiary Matriculation Examination (UTME) syllabus in Literature in English is to prepare the candidates for the Board’s examination. It is designed to test their achievement of the course objectives, which are to:

– stimulate and sustain their interest in Literature in English;
– create an awareness of the general principles of Literature and functions of language;
– appreciate literary works of all genres and across all cultures;
– apply the knowledge of Literature in English to the analysis of social, political and economic events in the society.

 

TOPICS/CONTENTS/NOTES OBJECTIVES

1. DRAMA

a. Types:
i. Tragedy
ii. Comedy
iii. Tragicomedy
iv. Melodrama
v. Farce
vi. Opera etc.
b. Dramatic Techniques
i. Characterisation
ii. Dialogue
iii. Flashback
iv. Mime
v. Costume
vi. Music/Dance
vii. Decor/scenery
viii. Acts/Scenes
ix. Soliloquy/aside
x. Lighting etc.
c. Interpretation of the Prescribed Texts
i. Theme
ii. Plot
iii. Socio-political context
iv. Setting

Candidates should be able to:
i. identify the various types of drama;
ii. analyse the contents of the various types of drama;
iii. compare and contrast the features of different dramatic types;
iv. demonstrate adequate knowledge of dramatic techniques used in each prescribed text;
v. differentiate between styles of selected playwrights;
vi. determine the theme of any prescribed text;
vii. identify the plot of the play;
viii. apply the lessons of the play to everyday living
ix. identify the spatial and temporal setting of the play.

2. PROSE

a. Types:
i. Fiction
– Novel
– Novella/Novelette
– Short story
ii. Non-fiction
– Biography
– Autobiography
– Memoir
iii. Faction: combination of fact and fiction
b. Narrative Techniques/Devices:
i. Point of view
– Omniscent/Third Person
– First Person
ii. Characterisation
– Round, flat, foil, hero, antihero, etc
iii. Language
c. Textual Analysis
i. Theme
ii. Plot
iii. Setting (Temporal/Spatial)
iv. Socio-political context

Candidates should be able to:
i. differentiate between types of prose;
ii. identify the category that each prescribed text belongs to;
iii. analyse the components of each type of prose;
iv. identify the narrative techniques used in each of the prescribed texts;
v. determine an author’s narrative style;
vi. distinguish between one type of character from another;
vii. determine the thematic pre-occupation of the author of the prescribed text;
viii. indicate the plot of the novel; identify the temporal and spatial setting of the novel.
ix. identify the temporal and spatial setting of the novel
x. relate the prescribed text to real life situations.

3. POETRY

a. Types:
i. Sonnet
ii. Ode
iii. Lyrics
iv. Elegy
v. Ballad
vi. Panegyric
vii. Epic
viii. Blank Verse, etc.
b. Poetic devices
i. Structure
ii. Imagery
iii. Sound(Rhyme/Rhythm, repetition, pun, onomatopoeia, etc.)
iv. Diction
v. Persona
c. Appreciation
i. Thematic preoccupation
ii. Socio-political relevance
iii. Style.

Candidates should be able to:
i. identify different types of poetry;
ii. compare and contrast the features of different poetic types:
iii. determine the devices used by various poets;
iv. show how poetic devices are used for aesthetic effect in each poem;
v. deduce the poet’s preoccupation from the poem;
vi. appraise poetry as an art with moral values;
vii. apply the lessons from the poem to real life situations.

4. GENERAL LITERARY PRINCIPLES

a. Literary terms:
foreshadowing, suspense, theatre, monologue, dialogue, soliloquy, symbolism, protagonist, antagonist, figures of speech, satire, stream of consciousness, synecdoche, metonymy, etc,
in addition to those listed above under the different genres.
b. Literary principles
i. Direct imitation in play;
ii. Versification in drama and poetry;
iii. Narration of people’s experiences;
iv. Achievement of aesthetic value, etc.
c. Relationship between literary terms and principles.

Candidates should be able to:
i. identify literary terms in drama, prose and poetry;
ii. identify the general principles of Literature;
iii. differentiate between literary terms and principles;
iv. use literary terms appropriately.

5. LITERARY APPRECIATION

Unseen passages/extracts from Drama, Prose and Poetry.

Candidates should be able to:
i. determine literary devices used in a given passage/extract;
ii. provide a meaningful inter-pretation of the given passage/extract;
iii. relate the extract to true life experiences.

UTME HARMONIZED PRESCRIBED TEXT BOOKS (LITERATURE IN ENGLISH) 2016-2019

Drama:

African:
i. Frank Ogodo Ogbeche : Harvest of Corruption

Non African:
i. William Shakespeare : Othello

Prose:

African:
i. Amma Darko : Faceless
ii. Bayo Adebowale : Lonely Days

Non-African:
i. Richard Wright : Native Son

Poetry:

African:
i. Birago Diop : Vanity
ii. Gbemisola Adeoti : Ambush
iii. Gabriel Okara : Piano and Drums
iv. Gbanabam Hallowell : The Dining Table
v. Lenrie Peter : The Panic of Growing Older
vi. Kofi Awoonor : The Anvil and the Hammer

Non African:
i. Alfred Tennyson : Crossing the Bar
ii. George Herbert : The Pulley
iii. William Blake : The School Boy
iv. William Morris : The Proud King

WHAT IS RELIGIOUS KNOWLEDGE ?

By E. B. CASTLE THE concern for Christian education is the child of fear and shame—fear of triumphant paganism and shame of Christian failure. But the response is being made ; a response which is important although not altogether satisfying. The Times has opened its columns to weighty correspondence on moral rearmament; manifestoes by Church leaders on the social relations of mankind are followed by conferences of Christian people concerned to rebuild society and bring religion to the common man ; enlightened syllabuses of Scripture teaching have been prepared by progressive local authorities ; 224 Members of Parliament have declared for ” a pervading spiritual influence which shall permeate the whole range of education and far beyond it.” If these words carry their full meaning a very big and unusual thing has happened in England.

But what is religious knowledge? It is first a knowledge of the nature of God and the nature of man. But for Christians the definition has to be extended: it is knowledge• of the nature of God and the nature of man as expressed in the life and death of Jesus. But it is even more than that. It is a knowledge of ourselves in relation to the nature of God and the teaching of Jesus. This means that it is also a knowledge of ourselves in relation to our neighbour ; an unremitting consciousness of our relation to man through God and to God through man ; the realisation that we have not understood. God or the nature of God until we have expressed it in action on behalf of our neighbour with imaginative sincerity and selflessness. Religious knowledge is not knowing only ; it is also being and doing. It comes of devotional experience when this is in unity with social experience; it is a knowledge of the relationship between the highest inward experience of divine love and its highest outward expression among men.

This unity between personal religion and the social content of Christianity must be a vital part of any attempt to impart religious knowledge. Without it any attempt to produce Christian character and the Christian citizen will fail. The qualities we associate with Christian character surely are these: Faith in the Creator Spirit, God, and a lively consciousness of the contemporary presence of Christ, alive today as in his first revelation 2,000 years ago ; discipline to truth in whatever form it may be revealed ; willingness to submit to the leadings of conscience when tested by Christian standards ; sensitiveness to social obligation ; reverence for men of every race and colour as part of the great family of God ; an inner integrity of spirit which gives serenity of mind in the midst of hurry and excitement ; courage to co-operate by good means for all good ends. Something like this is the aim of religious knowledge.

It is clear, then, that we cannot teach religious knowledge in the usual way, because it is not a ” subject ” but life itself. Those, therefore, who want to see more adequate arrange- ments for the inculcation of such knowledge must be clear about the kind of life for which they wish to prepare the pupil. This requires us to have a philosophy of education which is related to our idea of a Christian community ; for it must not be forgotten that education takes place in an essentially social setting. We must see education as a means of attaining throughout the nation an integrated Christian culture ; a means of developing a community-sense which has for its purpose the fullest expression of the Christian way of life. For we can no longer teach Christian principles without declaring what they mean in terms not only of personal dens don but also of community-life. In the ancient phrase of our Master we have, indeed, to seek first the Kingdom of God, realising at the same time its essential inwardness and also its complementary outwardness. In terms of teaching-technique this means that the pupil must be made aware that these high things he is learning are related to a high purpose. But it is vital to the process that he should also be aware that his teachers, and still more those who organise the social structure in which he lives, are also conscious of this high purpose.

This requires that those who appeal for ” a pervading spiritual influence which shall permeate the whole range of education and far beyond it ” shall realize that their aim will not be attained by changes in syllabus, teachers’ training and primary-school time-tables, but only in a cultural, social religious venture capable of creating a social framework worthy of a Christian people. Imagine the power given to the young teacher, and to the older disillusioned teacher, if he felt himself to be playing his part in a community which was in very deed implementing those divine principles of Christian love and justice which the Board of Education required him to teach. This power has been denied him, for the educational system of which he is a part is not even a reflection of what a Christian community might be. Today religious knowledge, if properly taught, can only be a criticism d things as they are. And yet in none of the social services is there greater chance of approximating social structure to Christian requirements than in that of education.

It may be thought that I have strayed far from the subject But I hope I have made it clear that we have no right to expect the highest response from children unless we respond by creating conditions wherein these high things may grow. Can it be seriously maintained that the noble appeal of Members of Parliament can have any substantial bearing 00 the lives of the millions of children who leave school half educated at 14.o? When love is active among them they will know what love is. That is why Jesus fed the five thousand.

It is fortunate that the great truths of religion are simple and can be comprehended by the young. Jesus was quilt clear on that point. There is nothing in my ‘definition religious knowledge which cannot be grasped by children if presented in simple forms and subsequently developed as maturity approaches, and if constantly related ‘to the experience of the child. The old antiquarian approach to the Hebr. Scriptures has almost killed youthful interest in them ; the stress on a credal basis for Christianity in early years been unhelpful to the acceptance of the New Testament by depriving it of relevance to the light of Christ in children’s own hearts and his living Spirit active in the world to-day. II dealing with the Scriptures we have to remember that nor aim is always to transform Scripture knowledge into religious knowledge. For instance, we older folk know that the greatest message in the Old Testament is that of the Hebrew Prophets: separate with God’s intention for man and society and win ; greeks strange gods and perish. Build your life and your social institutions on justice and mercy and you will have a full e; build them on greed and hate and you will reap the nits of vice. This message, born out of deep religious experience, is the message for the twentieth century. It is religious knowledge. Young people will understand it and fortified by it, for it is a challenge, and gives them a real b to do. And in doing the job they will find religion and single spirit.

similarly the story of the Gospels is not that of ” an ideally ood man brought to an ideally bad end,” for which we can e sorry and pass on. Its theme is God and neighbour ; the cure of God expressed in Christ ; the nature of neighbourli- ess expressed by Jesus. But, again, it was God now and ur neighbour now ; then, as today. Throughout our treat- ent of the inward and outward expressions of Christ’s teach- g, the stress should always be on the timelessness of God nd Christ. These things of long ago are for us now. Stretch our imaginations and see where they take you today. I am minded of Penn’s challenging words on the Scriptures: Can you set your seal they are true by the work of the me spirit in you that gave them forth to the holy ancients? ” his unity in the mind of the thinking child is so important ; nly through it can we begin to teach religious knowledge.

At a time when Europe had been devastated by a bloody ar and darkness seemed to have submerged Europe and lotted out his homeland, Comenius wrote these brave words o the English Royal Society in 1668: ” Yet when the fire of war was spreading beyond her borders to seize first the neighbouring countries and then the whole of Europe, and was threatening the Christian world with disaster and desolation, I had no greater comfort than I found in the ancient promises of God concerning the supreme and final Light, that it should in the end put darkness to flight. And if any human aid were needed for this I thought that it could only come from the better instruction of the young in all matters from the most elementary and fundamental, if they were to be delivered from the mazes of the world.”

Christian Religious Knowledge (CRK) Syllabus from JAMB

The aim of this 2016/2017 Unified Tertiary Matriculation Examination (UTME) syllabus in Christian Religious Studies is to prepare the candidates for the Board’s examination. It is designed to test their achievement of the course objectives, which are to:

1. acquire the knowledge and understanding of the tenets of the Christian faith as contained in the Bible
2. interpret biblical teachings and themes;
3. apply biblical teachings and tenets to life in society;
4. evaluate the level of application of biblical teachings and tenets to life in society.
The syllabus is divided into four sections, namely:
SECTION A: Themes from Creation to the Division of the Kingdom
SECTION B: Themes from the Division of the Kingdom to the Return from Exile and the Prophets
SECTION C: Themes from the four Gospels and Acts of the Apostles
SECTION D: Themes from selected Epistles

 

TOPICS/CONTENTS/NOTES OBJECTIVES
   
SECTION A:
Themes from Creation to the Division of the Kingdom

1. The Sovereignty of God

God as Creator and Controller of the Universe (Gen. 1 and 2) cf. Amos 9:5-6; Is. 45:5-12
Ps. 19:1-6

Candidates should be able to:

i. define the term ‘sovereignty;
ii. analyse God’s process of creation;
iii. interpret the sequence of creation;
iv. identify man’s role in advancing God’s purpose in creation.

   

2. The Covenant

(a) The flood and God’s covenant with Noah (Gen. 6:1-22; 7:1-24; 9:1-17)
(b) God’s covenant with Abraham (Gen. 11:31-32; 12:1-9; 17:1-21; 21:1-13; 25:19-26)
(c) God’s covenant with Israel (Ex. 19; 20; 24:1-11) cf. Deut. 28:1-19
(d) The New Covenant (Jer. 31:31-34; Ezek 36:25-28)

Candidates should be able to:

i. explain the concept of covenant;
ii. examine the importance and implication of the covenants;
iii. distinguish between God’s covenants with Noah, Abraham and Israel;
iv. Distinguish between the old and the new covenants

   

3. Leadership qualities:

Examples of
(a) Joseph (Gen. 37:1-28; 41:1-57; 45:1-15)
(b) Moses (Ex. 1; 2; 3; 4:1-17; 5; 12; Num. 13:1-20; 14:1-19)
(c) Joshua (Num. 13:21-33; 27:15-23; Josh. 1:1-15; 6; 7; 24:1-31)
(d) Judges (Deborah – Judges. 4:1-24; Gideon: Judges 6:11-40; Samson : Judges 13:1-7, 21-25; 16:4-31)

Candidates should be able to:

i. examine the circumstances that gave rise to the leadership of Joseph, Moses, Joshua and the Judges;
ii. identify the major talents of these leaders;
iii. assess God’s role in the works of these leaders;
iv. analyse the achievements of these leaders.

   

4. Divine providence, Guidance and Protection

(a) Guidance and Protection (Gen. 24:1-61; 28:10-22; 46:1-7: Ex. 13:17-22; 14:1-4; 10-31)
(b) Provision (Gen. 21:14-18; 22:1-14; Ex. 16:1-21; 17:1-7; Num. 20:1-13; 1 Kings 17:1-16)

Candidates should be able to:

i. identify the different ways by which God guided and protected the people of Israel;
ii. specify how God provided for His people;
iii. identify the different occasions when God provided for Israel.

   

5. Parental responsibility:

Examples of
(a) Eli and Samuel (1 Sam. 2:11-36; 3:2-18; 4:10-22: 8:15)
(b) David (11 Sam. 13; 15:1-29; 18; 19:1-8)
(c) Asa (1 Kings 15:9-15; 22:41-44; cf. Deut. 6:4-9; Prov. 4:1-10; 13:1; 24; 22:6; 23:13-14; 31:10-31)

Candidates should be able to:

i. determine the extent to which Eli, Samuel and David were responsible for the short-comings of their children:
ii. describe how Asa pleased God.

   

6. Obedience and Disobedience

(i) Obedience and Rewards:
Examples of
(a) Abraham (Gen. 22:1-19)
(b) Hebrew Midwives (Ex. 1:8-22)
(c) David (1 Sam. 30:1-20)
ii) Disobedience and Consequences:
Examples of
(a) Adam (Gen. 2:15-25; 3)
(b) Collection of Manna (Ex. 16:22-30)
(c) The Golden Calf (Ex. 32)
(d) Moses (Num. 20:7-12; Deut. 34:1-6)
(e) Saul (1 Sam. 10:1-16; 15:1-25; 16:14-23; 31:1-13)

ii. indicate the reasons for their disobedience;
iii. identify the consequences of disobedience
   

7. A man after God’s own heart

(a) The early life of David (1 Sam. 16:1-13; 17; 18:17-30; 22:1-5; 24:1-23; II Sam. 2:1-7; 3:1-39)
(b) David’s submission to the will of God (I Sam. 26:1-25); II Sam 12:15-25
(c) David’s repentance and forgiveness (II Sam. 11; 12:1-15, cf. Ps. 51:130)

Candidates should be able to:

i. identify David’s childhood experiences;
ii. specify how David submitted to the will of God;
iii. examine the situations that led to David’s sin and repentance;
iv. identify why God forgave David.

   

8. Decision – Making

(a) Reliance on a medium (I Sam. 28:3-25)
(b) The wisdom of Solomon (I Kings 3:3-28; 4:29-34; 5:1-12; 8:1-53)
(c) Unwise policies of Solomon and Rehoboam (I Kings 9:15-23; 11:1-40; 12:1-20)

Candidates should be able to:

i. identify the source of Solomon’s wisdom;
ii. compare the different ways used by Saul and Solomon in making decisions;
iii. analyse the decisions made by Saul, Solomon and Rehoboan.
iv. assess the consequences of Solomon and Rehoboam’s unwise decisions.

   
SECTION B:

Themes from the Division of the Kingdom to the Return from Exile and the Prophets

 
   

1. Greed and its effects

Examples of
(a) Ahab (I Kings 21:1-29; 22:1-40; II Kings 9:30-37)
(b) Gehazi (II Kings 5:1-27 cf (Josh 7)

Candidates should be able to:

i. deduce the meaning of greed;
ii. distinguish between Ahab and Gehazi’s greed;
iii. analyse the consequences of Ahab and Gehazi’s greed.

   

2. The Supremacy of God

Religious tension and the power of God on Mount Carmel (I Kings 16:29-34; 17:1-7; 18; 19:1-18)

Candidates should be able to:

i. assess the religious situation in Israel at the time of Elijah and Ahab;
ii. identify the characters involved in the contest on Mount Carmel
iii. differentiate between God’s power and that of Baal.

   

3. Religious reforms in Judah

(a) Cleansing of the Temple (II Kings 22)
(b) Renewal of the Covenant (II Kings 23:1-30)

Candidates should be able to:

i. analyse Josiah’s religious reforms;
ii. determine the reasons for the renewal of the covenant;
iii. assess the significance of the reforms.

   

4. Concern for Judah

(a) The fall of Jerusalem (II kings 24; 25:1-17)
(b) Condition of Judah (Neh. 1:1-11; Ezra 1:1-11)
(c) Response to the state of Judah (Neh. 2; 4:1-23 Ezra 3:4; 5; 6; 7)

Candidates should be able to:

i. identify the reasons for the fall of Jerusalem;
ii. examine the condition of Judah during the exile;
iii. analyse the people’s response to the call of Nehemiah and Ezra to rebuild Jerusalem
iv. distinguish between Nehemiah and Ezra’s responses to the opposition of their enemies

   

5. Faith, Courage and Protection:

Examples of Daniel, Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego (Dan. L; 3:1-30: 6:1-28

Candidates should be able to:

i. analyse the stories of Shadrach, Meshach, Abednego and Daniel;
ii. determine the occasions in which the four men demonstrated faith;
iii. analyse the effects of the faith of the four men on the Babylonians.

   

6. God’s message to Nineveh

Jonah and his message (Jonah 1; 2; 3 and 4)

Candidates should be able to:

i. analyse the story of Jonah’s call;
ii. describe the consequences of Jonah’s disobedience;
iii. assess the effect of Jonah’s message on the Ninevites;
iv. emulate the example of the Ninevites.

   

7. Social justice, True religion and Divine love

(a) Social justice and true religion (Amos 2:6-8; 4; 5:1-25; 6:1-14; 7:10-17; 8:4-14) cf James 1:19-27
(b) Divine love and human response (Hosea 1; 2; 3; 4; 6:1-11; 14)

Candidates should be able to

i. determine what true religion is;
ii. identify the ills that led to the call for social justice in Amos’ time;
iii. examine the condition in Israel during Hosea’s time;
iv. analyse Hosea’s portrayal of divine love and human response.

   

8. Holiness and Divine call

(Isaiah 6:1-13; Ezek. 2; 3:1-11; Jer. 1:4-10)

Candidates should be able to:

i. distinguish the calls of Isaiah, Ezekiel and Jeremiah;
ii. compare the assignments given to these prophets;
iii. determine the need for God’s people to be holy.

   

9. Punishment and Hope

(Jer. 3:11-18; 32:26-35; Ezek. 18; 37:1-14; Isaiah 61)

Candidates should be able to:

i. describe the situations that led to the punishment of Israel;
ii. identify the conditions for hope;
iii. determine the benefits of restoration.

   
SECTION C:

Themes from the four Gospels and the Acts of the Apostles

 
   

1. The birth and early life of Jesus

(a) John, the forerunner of Jesus (Lk. 1:5-25; 57-66; 3:1-20; 7:18-35; Mk. 1:1-8; 6:14-29; Mt. 3:1-12: Matt.11:2-19 Jn. 1:6-8; 19-37; 3:22-36)
(b) The birth and boyhood of Jesus (Mt. 1:18-25; 2; Lk. 1:26-45:2)

Candidates should be able to:

i. compare the stories of the births of John and Jesus;
ii. assess the importance of John as the forerunner of Jesus;
iii. describe the boyhood of Jesus

   

2. The baptism and temptation of Jesus

(Mt. 3:13-17; 4:1-11; Mk. 1:9-13; Lk. 3:21-22; 4:1-13)

Candidates should be able to:
i. determine the meaning and purpose of the baptism of Jesus
ii. enumerate the temptations of Jesus;
iii. examine the significance of the temptations of Jesus.
   

3. Discipleship

(a) The call of the first disciples (Mt. 4:18 22; 9:9-13; Mk. 1:16-20; 2:13-17; Lk. 5:1-11; 27-32)
(b) The demands of discipleship (Mt. 8:19-22; Lk. 9:57-63; 14:25-33)

Candidates should be able to:

i. identify the first disciples to be called by Jesus;
ii. determine the demands of discipleship

   

4. Miracles

(a) Nature miracles
(i) Stilling the storm (Mt. 8:23-27; Mk. 4:35-41; Lk.8:22-25)
(ii) Feeding of the five thousand (Mt. 14:13-24; Mk. 6:30-44; Lk, 9:10-17; Jn. 6:1-13)
(iii) Walking on the sea (Mt. 14:22-26; Mk. 6:45-52; Jn. 6:16-21)
(iv) Changing water to wine (Jn. 2:1-11)
(b) Miracles of resuscitation
(i) The raising of Lazarus (Jn. 11:1-45)
(ii) The raising of Jairus’ daughter (Lk. 8:41-42, 49-56; Mk. 5:21-43)
(iii) The raising of the widow’s son at Nain (Lk. 7:11-17)
(c) Healing miracles
(i) The lepers (Mt. 8:1-4; Mk. 1:40-45; Lk. 5:12-16; 17:11-19)
(ii) The paralytic at the pool (Jn. 5:1-17)
(iii) The centurion’s servant (Mt. 8:5-13; Lk. 7:1-10)
(iv) The blind (Jn. 9:1-12; Mk. 10:46-52;
Lk. 18:35-43)
(d) Exorcism
(i) The Gerasene (Gadarene) demoniac (Mt. 8:28-34; Mk. 5:1-20; Lk. 8:26-39)
(ii) The epileptic boy (Mk. 9:14-29; Lk. 9:37-43a; Mt. 17:14-21)

Candidates should be able to:

i. classify the different miracles of Jesus;
ii. indicate the occasion of each of the miracles;
iii. examine the significance of each of the miracles;

   

5. The Parables

(a) Parables of the kingdom
(i) The sower (Mt. 13:1-23; Mk. 4:1-20)
(ii) The weeds (Mt. 13:24-30; 36-43)
(iii) The drag-net (Mt. 13:47-50)
(iv) The wedding garment (matt 22:1-14)
(b) Parables about love of God (Mt. 18:12- 14; Lk. 15:1-32)
(c) Parables about love for one another (Lk.10:25-37; 16:19-31)
(d) Parable about wealth: The rich fool (Lk. 12:13-21)
(e) Parables on prayer (Lk 18:2-14)

Candidates should be able to:

i. classify the different parables of Jesus;
ii. identify the occasion of each parable;
iii. interpret the meaning of each parable;
iv. give reasons why Jesus taught in parables.

   

6. Sermon on the Mount

(Mt. 5; 6; Lk. 6:17-26)

Candidates should be able to:

i. analyse the teachings on the Mount;
ii. identify the demands of the Kingdom;
iii. determine the consequences of worldly possessions;
iv. associate the rewards for obedience with the sermon on the Mount.

   

7. Mission of the disciples

(a)The mission of the twelve
(Mt. 10:5-15; Mk. 6:7-13; Lk. 9:1-16)
(b)The mission of the seventy (Lk. 10:1-24)

Candidates should be able to:

i. distinguish between the mission of the twelve and the seventy;
ii. specify the instructions to the disciples;
iii. assess the outcomes of the missions.

   

8. The Great Confession

(Mt. 16:13-20; Mk. 8:27-30; Lk. 9:18-22)

Candidates should be able to:

i. analyse the confession by Peter;
ii. identify the occasion of the Great Confession;
iii. examine the significance of the Great Confession

   

9. The Transfiguration

(Mt. 17:1-13; Mk. 9:2-13; Lk. 9:28-36)

Candidates should be able to:

i. trace the events leading to the Transfiguration;
ii. determine the significance of the Transfiguration to the disciples;
iii. identify the personalities involved in the Transfiguration account

   

10. The Triumphal Entry and the cleansing of the Temple

(Mt. 21:1-17; Mk. 11:1-19; Lk. 19:29-48)

Candidates should be able to:

i. recount the Triumphal Entry and the cleansing of the Temple;
ii. determine the significance of the Triumphal Entry and the cleansing of the Temple;
iii. examine how the cleansing of the Temple caused hostility towards Jesus.

   

11. The Last Supper

(Mt. 26:17-30; Mk. 14:10-26
Lk. 22:7-23; Jn. 13:2-38)

Candidates should be able to:

i. trace the story of the Last Supper;
ii. evaluate the significance of the Last Supper.

   

12. The trials and the death of Jesus

(a) The trials of Jesus before
(i) the High Priest
(Mt. 26:36-75;
Mk. 14:53-72
Lk. 22:66-71)
(ii) Pilate
(Mt. 27:11-26; Mk. 15:1-15;
Lk. 23:1-5; 13-25;
Jn. 18:28-40; 19:1-16)
(iii) Herod
(Lk. 23:6-12)
(b) Crucifixion and burial of Jesus
(Mt. 27:32-66; Lk. 23:26-56;
Mk. 15:16-47; Jn. 19:17-42)

Candidates should be able to:

i. analyse the different trials of Jesus;
ii. describe the crucifixion and burial of Jesus;
iii. deduce the lessons of the death of Jesus.

   

13. Resurrection, appearances and ascension of Jesus

(Mt. 28:1-20; Mk. 16:1-20;
Lk. 24:1-53; Jn. 20:1-31;
Acts 1:1-11)

Candidates should be able to:

(i) trace the stories of the resurrection, appearances and ascension of Jesus;
(ii) compare the personalities involved in the stories.
(iii) analyse the relevance of the resurrection
and ascension of Jesus

   

14. Jesus’ teachings about Himself

(a) The Bread of Life and the
Living Water (Jn. 4:7-15;
6:25-58)
(b) The Light of the World
(Jn. 1:4-8; 3:19-21; 8:12
9:1-5; 12:35-36 1 Jn. 1:5-7)
(c) The Door the Lamb and the Good
Shepherd (Jn 1:29-34; 10:1-18)
(d) The True Vine (Jn. 15:1-11)
(e) The resurrection (Jn.11:25)

Candidates should be able to:

(i) analyse the different teachings
of Jesus about Himself;
(ii) deduce the reasons for Jesus’ teachings about
Himself;
(iii) interpret the meanings of the
symbols used by Jesus about
Himself.

   

15. Love

(a) God’s love for man
(Jn. 3:16-18)
(b) Love for one another
(Jn. 13:34-35; 15:12-13
cf. I Jn. 4:7-21)

Candidates should be able to:

(i) describe God’s love for man;
(ii) specify the ways they can love one another;
(iii) evaluate the significance of love.

   

16. Fellowship in the Early Church

(a) Communal living
(Acts 1:15-26; 2:41-47;
4:32-37)
(b) Problems of communal
living and solutions
(Acts 5:1-11, 6:1-6)

Candidates should be able to:

(i) identify the reasons for communal living in the Early Church;
(ii) identify the problems of communal living and their solutions;
(iii) examine how communal living helped the growth of the Early Church.

   

17. The Holy Spirit and the mission of the Church

(a) The pentecost (Acts 1:8;
2:1-41)
(b) The mission of the Church
(Acts 8:4-40)

Candidates should be able to:

(i) trace the story of the pentecost;
(ii) examine the significance of the pentecost
experience
(iii) analyse the mission of the Church.

   

18. Opposition to the Gospel message

(a) The arrest and imprisonment of
Peter and John
(Acts 3; 4:1-22; 5:17-42
12:1-24)
(b) The martyrdom of Stephen
(Acts 6:8-15; 7)
(c) Persecution by Saul
(Acts 8:1-3; 9:1-2)
cf. Gal. 1:11-17
(d) Persecution of Paul (Acts 16:11-40;19:23- 41;21:27-36) cf 2 Cor:11:23-33

Candidates should be able to:

(i) trace the story of the arrest and
imprisonment of Peter and John;
(ii) trace the events that led to the
martyrdom of Stephen;
(iii) describe the role of Saul in the persecution of the
Church;
(iv) evaluate the importance of persecution to the growth of the Church.
(v) account for the persecution of paul.

   

19. Mission to the Gentiles

(a) Conversion of Saul
26:9-18)
(b) Conversion of Cornelius
(Acts 10:1-48)
(c) The commissioning and mission of Paul
(Acts 13; 14:1-20);
(d) The Council of Jerusalem
(Acts 15:1-35; Gal. 2:1-21)

Candidates should be able to:

(i) compare the conversions of Saul
and Cornelius;
(ii) analyse the commissioning and
mission of Paul;
(iii) examine the main decisions at the Council of
Jerusalem;
(iv) identify the personalities
involved at the Council of Jerusalem;
(v) examine the relevance the main decisions at the Council of Jerusalem;
(vi) assess Paul’s role in the mission
to the Gentiles.

   
SECTION D:
Themes from Selected Epistles
 
   

1. Justification by Faith

(Rom. 3:21-24; 5:1-11; 10:1-13)

Candidates should be able to:

(i) interpret the phrase ‘justification’
by faith;
(ii) identify the basic conditions for justification;
(iii) determine the fruits of justification

   

2. The Law and Grace

(Rom. 4:13-25; 5:18-21;
Gal. 3:10-14; 19-29)

Candidates should be able to:

(i) examine the purpose and significance of the law and grace;
(ii) identify the place of the Law among the Jews.

   

3. New life in Christ

(Rom. 6:1-4; 12-14; Col. 3:1-17;
Gals. 5:16-26; II Cor. 5:16-19;
I Thess. 4:1-8; Rom. 12)

Candidates should be able to:

(i) describe the characteristics of
the old life;
(ii) analyse the new life in Christ;
(iii) identify the conditions of the
new life;
(iv) examine the benefits of the new life

   

4. Christians as joint heirs with Christ

(Gal. 3:23-29; 4:1-7)

Candidates should be able to:

(i) describe how Christians are
joint heirs with Christ;
(ii) indicate the benefits of being
joint heirs with Christ

   

5. Humility

(Phil. 2:1-11; I Pet. 5:5-11)

Candidates should be able to:

(i) determine the meaning of humility
(ii) identify the requirements of humility;
(iii) identify the rewards of humility.

   

6. Forgiveness

(Philemon; II Cor. 2:5-11)

Candidates should be able to:

(i) analyse Paul’s teaching on forgiveness;
(ii) assess the benefits of forgiveness

   

7. Spiritual gifts

(I Cor. 12; Rom. 12:3-18; I Cor. 14)

Candidates should be able to:

(i) identify the different spiritual gifts;
(ii) analyse the benefits of spiritual gifts to the individual and the church.

   

8. Christian Giving

(Phil. 4:14-20; II Cor. 8:1-5; 9)
Cf. Matt 6:2-4

Candidates should be able to:

(i) interpret the concept of Christian giving;
(ii) relate the teachings of Paul on Christian giving.
(iii) identify the importance of Christian giving

   

9. Civic responsibility

(Rom. 13; I Tim. 2:1-4)

Candidates should be able to:

(i) identify the need for obedience to authority;
(ii) specify the requirements of good citizenship.

   

10. Dignity of labour

(II Thess. 3:6-15; Col. 3:23-25)

Candidates should be able to:

(i) interpret the concept of dignity of labour;
(ii) analyse the benefits of labour

   

11. The second coming of Christ

a) The signs of the Coming of Christ
(1 Thess. 4:13-18; II Thess. 2:1-12)
b) Preparation for His coming
(I Thess. 5:1-11; II Pet. 3:1-13)

Candidates should be able to:

(i) identify the signs of the Second Coming of Christ;
(ii) specify the preparations for His coming;
(iii) indicate what will happen during His Second Coming.
(iv) examine the importance of His coming

   

12. Impartiality

(James 2:1-13)
cf. Acts 10:34-35; Matt 7:1-5

Candidates should be able to:

(i) interpret the concept of impartiality;
(ii) identify causes of partiality
(iii) examine the consequences of partiality

   

13. Effective prayer

(James 1:2-8; 4:1-3; 5:13-18) cf.
Matt 6:5-13

Candidates should be able to:

(i) identify the requirements of effective prayer;
(ii) distinguish between effective and ineffective prayer.
(iii) identify the importance of prayer.

   

14. Christian living in the community

(a) Interpersonal relationships
among Christians (I Pet. 5:1-4;
Rom. 12:3-21; 2 Pet. 1:3-11;
Heb.13:1-21)
(b) Christians living among non- Christians
(I Pet. 2:3-25; Rom. 15:1-2)
(c) Christian attitude to persecution
(I Pet. 1:5-9; 4:1-19; 1 Pet. 3:13-22)
(d) Relationship in the Christian family
(Eph. 6: 1-9; Col. 3:18-21;
I Pet. 3:1-7)

Candidates should be able to:

(i) determine interpersonal relationships among
Christians;
(ii) analyse Christian living among non-Christians;
(iii) relate Christian attitude to persecution;
(iv) determine the relationship in the Christian family;
(v) examine the importance of maintaining good relationships.

   

15. Corruption

(1 Tim 6:6-11; 2 Tim 3:8; 2 Pet. 1:4-11; James 5:1-6)

Candidates should be able to:

(i) define the term corruption.
(ii) identify the causes of corruption.
(iii) determine the effects and consequences of corruption.
(iv) identify ways of curbing corruption.

   

16. Sexual Immorality

(a) Prostitution
(1Cor.6:16-20)
cf. Prov.7:10-27;23:27-28
(b) Adultery and Fornication
(Heb. 13:4, Eph. 5:3-10)
cf. Matt 5:28-32;Deut. 22:22; Lev. 20:10
(c) Homosexuality
(Rom. 1:24-32)
cf. Lev.18:21-30; 20:13

Candidates should be able to:

(i) identify what constitute sexual immorality.
(ii) determine the causes of sexual immorality.
(iii) examine the effects and consequences of sexual immorality.
(iv) identify ways of curbing sexual immorality.

LIFE QUOTES

Life is a gift that has been given to you. It is in your hands to make the best out of it–dare to believe that you can. Through the ups and downs, you’ll find a lesson to learn that will make you a better person. Each experience–good and bad–makes you grow. Get along with life and surely, things will become easier for you. Live for today and enjoy every moment. Capture the best that life has to offer you.
Here’s a collection of valuable quotes about life to inspire you to make the best out of it:
“In the end, it’s not the years in your life that count. It’s the life in your years.”

“The greatest day in your life and mine is when we take total responsibility for our attitudes. That’s the day we truly grow up.”

“Life is not a problem to be solved, but a reality to be experienced.” Soren Kierkegaard

“What we think determines what happens to us, so if we want to change our lives, we need to stretch our minds.”

“Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or present are certain to miss the future.”

DE JACOB’S