Buhari writes Nigerians

President Muhammadu Buhari has written Nigerians, demanding a longer period of rest and thanking them for the goodwill messages they have sent and are still sending to him as well as for the prayers for his health and well-being.

Buhari wrote through his Special Adviser, Media and Publicity, Femi Adesina on Tuesday.

buhari-tinubu-london-300x182

File: PRESIDENT BUHARI IN LONDON: PRESIDENT MUHAMMADU BUHARI RECEIVES APC CHIEFTAINS, SENATOR BOLA AHMED TINUBU AND CHIEF BISI AKANDE, AT ABUJA HOUSE IN LONDON ON THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2017

According to the statement, “President Muhammadu Buhari thanks millions of Nigerians who have been sending good wishes and praying for his health and well-being in mosques and churches throughout the country. The President is immensely grateful for the prayers, show of love and concern. President Buhari wishes to reassure Nigerians that there is no cause for worry. During his normal annual check-up, tests showed he needed a longer period of rest, necessitating the President staying longer than originally planned.” Recall that President Buhari had initially written the Senate to proceed to London on a 10-day working leave. He had written the Senate that the Vice President, Professor Yemi Osinbajo will act on his behalf as President for the 10 days that he would be on medical vacation. However, at the elapse of the 10 days, the President wrote the Senate again, demanding an extension of the leave on grounds that he needed to complete and receive the results of a series of tests recommended by his doctors. Buhari’s letter of extension met with backlash from some Nigerians who felt the President should speak to Nigerians directly.

Read more at: http://www.vanguardngr.com/2017/02/breaking-buhari-writes-nigerians-demands-longer-period-rest/

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1.7million candidates expected to sit for 2017 JAMB – Oloyede

ABEOKUTA-Non fewer than 1.7million candidates are expected to sit for 2017 Unified Tertiary Matriculation Examination in April.
The Registrar, Joint Admissions and Matriculation Board, Prof. Ishaq Oloyede disclosed this on Tuesday at Abeokuta at the sideline of the examination body’s Information and Communication Technology retreat involving civil society groups, students and other major stakeholders. Oloyede said the JAMB also aimed at increasing the capacities of its Computer Based Test Centres in order to make the April examination seamless. He said, “We are expecting 1.7million candidates to sit for JAMB this year and we want to make sure we satisfy these candidates within a week or thereabout. “That is why we are increasing the capacity of the Computer-Based Test centres to be able to examine more candidates within a given date.” Oloyede who said the body would not promise a hitch-free examination, noted that there were changes and innovations ongoing which would send some illegal operators who had defrauded candidates in the past, out of business. The JAMB boss, however, said the examination body would not be deterred in its mission to serve its candidates better. He said, “I must be frank with you, I cannot promise a hitch- free examination because we are testing certain things. “We are changing certain things. We want to question the status quo and of course, we expect a fight back by interest that will be trampled upon. “We are going to be as sincere as possible in the direction we are going. We are going to be as flexible as humanly possible. We are not promising hitch free examination. “We envisaged that there will be hitches here and there, but they will not be insurmountable. Rather than promising the nation hitch free examination, we will be promising a direction we will all be pleased with. “Initially there might be hiccups and of course one would not have been appointed if it is routine. I believe that I have been given a very difficult job and that is why I am not promising that all will be smooth.” He argued that that was why JAMB invited stakeholders to critique its processes, because it would not want to continue in the wrong direction. He said, “We are creating some ICT facilities and we want our stakeholders, prospective candidates, respected scholars, institutions, civil societies to come together and critique what we are doing, so that we can be sure, before we go too far in a wrong direction. “This is a view of harvesting good ideas that could improve what we are doing.” He said the CBT had come to stay, as four African countries had indicated interest to come over to Nigeria to understudy it. “Of course, I believed that Nigeria is ripe for this (CBT). Nigeria is more advanced than some of these countries. At least, we have three or four countries that are observing our examination and they want to go the way of the conduct of the examination,”he said. While he said the JAMB would soon commence the sale of its forms for the 2017 UTME, he added that the examination body was also working on the possibility of conducting a mock examination “for some people who just want to try on what we are doing.”

Fani-Kayode Reacts To Phone Call Between Donald Trump And Buhari

fani-kayode12

Former Aviation Minister, Femi Fani-Kayode has said that US President, Donald Trump should have told President Muhammadu Buhari to stop supporting Fulani herdsmen when they spoke on phone.

Fani-Kayode, who took to his twitter handle @realFFK described Buhari as the friend of the immediate past US President, Barrack Obama.

“If it’s true that @realDonaldTrump spoke to @BarackObama’s friend @MBuhari, it is good news! I hope he told him to stop killing Christians.

“…and Shiite Muslims and to stop supporting the Fulani terrorists and herdsmen. Meanwhile, I hope he will soon speak to his own people too.

Recall that Trump yesterday spoke with Buhari who is currently on medical vacation in the United Kingdom, UK.

The phone conversation between both leaders was at the request of the US President.

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He also working tirelessly towards the crew second show of the season, titled the Second Episode, which is coming up on the 2nd of January, 2018.

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JAMB to partner Ministry of Foreign Affairs on CBT examination abroad

JAMB

The Joint Admissions and Matriculation Board (JAMB) on Sunday, said it would partner with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to conduct public examination through Computer Based Test (CBT) for Nigerians abroad.

JAMB’s Head of Public Relations, Dr Fabian Benjamin, made this known in an interview with the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) in Abuja.

Benjamin said that the collaboration was to enhance the conduct of Unified Tertiary Matriculation Examination (UTME) for foreign candidates in 2018.

He said 2017 UTME was conducted for foreign candidates on Sept. 30 in Gambia, Saudi Arabia, United Kingdom, Ghana, Cote D’ Voir, Benin Republic, Ethiopia, South Africa and Cameroun.

According to him, although the conduct of the examination was not justifiable, in terms of monetary value, there is need for JAMB to collaborate, to promote growth in the education sector.

“We are already promoting CBT in line with international best practices; we have taken it to some countries in Africa, we need to do more to encourage the practice.

“We have even gone ahead to see how we can put some countries on the global map by conducting our public examination there through CBT.

“What we want to do is to partner with the Ministry to be able to key into the global technology revolution as part of our foreign policy.

“We must be able to maximise profit, especially from West African countries that we are offering assistance, through scholarship, to school in Nigeria.

“We cannot achieve much by looking at things from naira and kobo, but through diplomatic relations there will be adequate room to gain through conduct of examination abroad,” he said.

The head of public relations explained that foreign candidates sat for examination in one session based on local time of their various countries, adding that the questions were deployed from the Board’s headquarters.

He decried message on the social media that the Minister of Education, Malam Adamu Adamu, had directed the refund of post UTME fee, describing the information as false and could create confusion in the public domain.

Benjamin urged the public to disregard the information, saying that institutions that had charged more than N2, 000 would be asked to make refund of the excess.

He described as unfortunate a situation where some institutions could not adhere to the minister’ directive about the payment of post-UTME.

JAMB reveals those who will get admission in 2017/2018 session

 

 

 

jamb-exam

The Joint Admissions and Matriculation Board (JAMB) on Thursday, said only candidates who meet the O’ level and A’ level requirements and other criteria set by institutions would be offered admission in 2017/2018.

‎JAMB Registrar, Prof. Is-haq Oloyede, stated this at a Training and Sensitization Forum on Central Admissions Processing System (CAPS) for admission offers, candidates and stakeholders on in Abuja.

Prof. Oloyede said: “Scoring higher than the cut-off mark does not guarantee admission but makes the candidate eligible for admission consideration. It is not UTME that qualifies the person. It is O level, A level that qualifies a person for admission.

“That is why you can go from here to UK, you can go to Ghana, Uganda, Republic of Benin, nobody ask you of your UTME, they ask for your O level because by law it is the school cert that qualifies you not JAMB,” he said.

He also warned that JAMB will not tolerate illegal admissions by any higher institution.

The body also stated that students admitted illegally won’t be regularised anymore.

“We know that we have abused the process. What we have been doing is to send N5,000 each to JAMB in the name of regularization without capturing their picture, without capturing anything. You pay N5,000 and then they are regularized.

“We have not stopped to do backlog but from 2016 upward we will not allow anybody to do backdoor admission. Anybody that is not properly admitted cannot benefit from regularization.

“You cannot admit anybody under the table. Let us know your problem and let us collectively solve the problem so that you do not need to do such thing.

“We don’t have accurate data because what we have on record is different from real life. We cannot continue to do that. We will protest to the whole world that we have 500 students in our institutions but in reality they are about 1 million but 500,000 thousand have been admitted illegally,” Oloyede remarked.

‘Quit notice to Igbo security threat, crime against the Nigerian State”.

UMUAHIA—OHANEZE Ndigbo Youth Council, OYC, has reacted angrily to the quit-the-North order given to Ndigbo by a coalition of Northern Youth groups, describing it as a “security threat and a crime against the Nigerian State”.

 

The coalition, including Arewa Citizens Action for Change, Arewa Youths Consultative Forum, Arewa Youths Development Foundation, Arewa Students Forum, Northern Emancipation Network, Northern Youths Stakeholders, among others, in what they called “Kaduna Declaration”, also called on Northern to leave Igbo land. Reacting to the action of the Northern youths Council urged Igbos in the North to “to stay put wherever they were across the country” and “to defend themselves in the event of any provocation and attack from Arewa Youths”. A statement issued by the President of Ohaneze Youths Council, Mazi Okechukwu Isiguzoro condemned the action of the Northern Youths and warned them to immediately reverse their position. According to Isiguzoro, “the ultimatum was a call for war and should be treated as such by security agents”, urging security agencies not overlook the threat. “They are on it again and this is a sad reminder of the civil war. This is how it started as a joke and before we knew it, a coordinated and simultaneous attack was launched against the Igbos in the North. “This is a sad development considering efforts being made to unite this country; this is a sad commentary considering the sacrifices Igbos have made in this country. “We, however, wish to state unequivocally that Igbos are not cowards. We are not afraid of Alhaji AbdulAziz Suleiman, Yerima Shetimma and their cohorts. “Ndigbo want to make it categorically clear that we are ready for them; we are cannot be intimidated by their ranting. The era of taking properties belonging to Ndigbo by force is gone. We won’t let that happen again. “To this end, we are calling on our people in the North not to shift any ground; they should remain where they are; this country belongs to all of us. Any attack on our people shall receive commensurate reaction”, OYC warned. OYC however, urged Northern Governors and the Northern Elders to call their youths to order and dissociate themselves from the threat on the Igbos, saying “failure to do so, we will take it that they are all equal partners to the threat”. “This is a drum of war coming from the North and should the Northern leaders fail to act accordingly, we shall be left with no option than to go beyond this stage. “We call on the Northern traditional and religious leaders headed by the Sultan of Sokoto to assure Igbos of their safety in the 19 Northern States. “We are calling on the President General Arewa Consultative Forum to call Northern Youths to order; they must be compelled to tender unreserved apology to Ndigbo‎ and stop fanning the embers of disunity among Nigerians. “‎We will not leave the North for the Northern Youths after developing the North with assets and business investment worth over N44 trillion. If they are preparing ground for abandoned properties, they have failed. “May we all call on security agencies to provide protection to all the Igbos in the 19 Northern States and their properties? Anything on the contrary means giving a backing to this orchestrated genocidal plot against Igbos. “May we call on the Federal Government to assure Ndigbo that they are part of this country, by living up to expectations of protecting their lives and properties. Failure to do so, we shall be left with no option than to defend ourselves. “We also call for the immediate arrest of Yerima and his group; this is a crime against the State and it should not be treated with levity. “Rather than chase around un-armed Biafran agitators, the DSS should go after these men who have declared war on the Nigeria State. “In the meantime, our people should be careful and vigilant. They should not hesitate to report any assault on them. We are watching and waiting”, OYC further said.

Literature-In-English JAMB SYLLABUS – 2017/18

GENERAL OBJECTIVES

The aim of the Unified Tertiary Matriculation Examination (UTME) syllabus in Literature in English is to prepare the candidates for the Board’s examination. It is designed to test their achievement of the course objectives, which are to:
1.Stimulate and sustain their interest in Literature in English;
2.Create an awareness of the general principles and functions of language;
3.Appreciate literary works of all genres and across all cultures;
4.Apply the knowledge of Literature in English to the analysis of social, political and economic events in the society.

DETAILED SYLLABUS

TOPICS/CONTENTS/NOTES
1. DRAMA
a. Types:
i.      Tragedy
ii.      Comedy
iii.     Tragicomedy
iv.     Melodrama
v.      Farce

b. Dramatic Techniques
i.     Characterisation
ii.     Dialogue
iii.    Flashback
iv.    Mime
v.     Costume
vi.    Music/Dance
vii.   Décor
viii.  Acts/Scenes
ix.   Soliloquy/aside etc.
c.  Interpretation of the PrescribedTexts
i.     Theme
ii.     Plot
iii.    Socio-political context

OBJECTIVES
Candidates should be able to:

i. identify the various types  of drama;
ii. analyse  the  contents  of  the various types of drama;
iii. compare and contrast the features of different dramatic types;
iv. demonstrate adequate knowledge of dramatic techniques used in each prescribed text;
v. differentiate between  styles of  selected playwrights;
vi. determine  the  theme  of  any prescribed text;
vii. identify the plot of the play;
viii. apply the lessons of the play to everyday living.

TOPICS/CONTENTS/NOTES
2.   PROSE
a. Types:
i.  Fiction
•   Novel
•   Novella
•   Short story
.
ii. Non-fiction
•   Biography
•   Autobiography
•   Memoir
b. Narrative Techniques/Devices:
i.   Point of view
•    Omni scent/ThirdPerson
•   First Person
ii: Setting
•   Temporal
•   Spatial/Geographical
iii. Characterisation
•   Round characters   .
•   Flat characters
iv. Language use

c. Textual Analysise
i. Theme
ii. Plot
iii. Socio-political context;

OBJECTIVES
Candidates should be able to:

i. differentiate between types of prose;
ii. identify the category that each  prescribed text belongs to;
iii. analyse  the  components  of  each type of prose;
iv. identify the narrative techniques used in each of the prescribed texts;
v. determine an author’s narrative style;
vi. distinguish between one type of character from another,
vii. determine the thematic pre- occupation of the author  of the prescribed text;
viii. indicate the plot of the novel;
ix.  relate the prescribed text to real life situations.

TOPICS/CONTENTS/NOTES
3.    POETRY
a. Types:
i.   Sonnet
ii.   Ode
iii.  Lyrics
iv.  Elegy
v.   Ballad
vi.  Panegyric
vii. Epic
viii. Blank Verse
b. PoeticDevices
i.   Sructure
ii.   Imagery
iii.  Rhyme/Rhythm
iv.   Diction
v.    Personal
c. Appreciation.
i.       Thematic preoccupation
ii.      Socio-political relevance

OBJECTIVES
Candidates should be able to:

i.   identify   different   types   of   poetry;
ii.   compare and contrast features of different  poetic types:
iii.  determine the devices used by various poets;

iv. show how poetic devices are usedfor aesthetic effect in each poem;
v.  deduce the poet’s preoccupation from the poem;
vi. appraise poetry as an art with moral values;
vii. apply the lessons from the poem to real life situations.

TOPICS/CONTENTS/NOTES
4. GENERAL LITERACY PRINCIPLES
a. Literary terms:
foreshadowing, suspense, theatre, monoloque, dialoque, soliloquy, symbolism, protagonist, ntagonist, figures of speech, satire, stream of consciousness etc, in addition to those listed above under the different genres.
b. Relationship between literary terms and principles.

OBJECTIVE
Candidates should be able to:

i.  identify literary terms in drama, prose and poetry;
ii. differentiate between literaryterms and principles;
iii. use literary terms appropriately.

TOPICS/CONTENTS/NOTES
5. LITERARY APPRECIATION
Unseen passage/extracts from Drama, Prose and Poetry.

OBJECTIVES
Candidates should be able to:

i.  determine literary devices used in a given passage/extract;
ii.  provide a meaningful inter- pretation of the given
passage/extract;
iii. relate the extract to true life experiences.

Literature in English
A LIST OF SELECTED AFRICAN AND NON-AFRICAN PLAYS, NOVELS AND POEMS
DRAMA:
African:
i.       JC De Craft: Sons and Daughters, UPL Non-African:
i.      William Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet, Newswan POETRY:
African:
i.       Buchi Emecheta: The Joys of Motherhood, Heinemann
ii.      Ferdinand Oyono: The Old Man and the Medal, Heinenmann
Non-African:
George Orwell: Nineteen Eighty Four, Newswan
POETRY:
African:
i.  Adeoti Gbemisola: ‘Naked Soles’
ii. D. Rubadiri: ‘An African Thunderstorm’
iii.Kobcna Eyi Acquah: ‘In the novel of the Soul’
iv.Mazisi Kunene: ‘Heritage of Liberation’
v. Okinba Launko: ‘End of the War’
vi.Traditional: ‘Give me the Minstrel’s Seat’
Non-African:
i.       Andrew Mabel: ‘To His Coy Mistress’
ii.      D.H.Lawrence: ‘Bat’
iii.     T. S. Elliot: ‘The Journey of the Magi’
iv.     Wendy Cope: ‘Sonnet’

Literature in English
RECOMMENDED TEXTS
1.ANTHOLOGIES
Gbemisola, A. (2005) Naked Soles, Ibadan Kraft
Eruvbctine, A. E. ct al (1991) Poetry for Secondary Schools, Lagos: Longman
Hayward. J. (cd.) (1968) The Penguin Book of English Verse, London Penguin Johnson, R. et al (eds.) (1996) New Poetry from Africa, Ibadan: UP Pic
Kermode, F. et al (1964) Oxford Anthology of English Literature, Vol. II,
London: OUP
Launko, O. (1987) Minted Coins, Ibadan: Heinemann
Senanu, K. E. and Vincent* T. (eds.) (1993) A Selection of African Poetry,
Lagos: Longman
Sonyinka, W. (ed.) (1987) Poems of Black Africa, Ibadan: Heinemann
Wendy Cope (1986) Making Cocoa for Kingsley Amis, London: Faber and
Faber

WAEC Literature-in-English Syllabus for 2016-2020

WAEC LITERATURE SYLLABUS FOR 2016-2020

*Unseen Drama
Williams Shakespeare: Othello

*African Prose
Amma Darko: Faceless
Bayo Adebowale: Lonely Days

*Non-African Prose
Richard Wright: Native Son
Patience Swift: The Last Goodman

*Non-African Drama
Oliver Goldsmith: She Stoops to Conquer
Lorraine Hansberry: A Raisin in the Sun

*African Drama
Frank Ogodo Ogbeche: Harvest of Corruption
Dele Charley: The Blood of a Stranger

*African Poetry
Birago Diop: Vanity
Gbemisola Adeoti: Ambush
Gabriel Okara: Piano and Drums
Gbanabam Hallowell: The Dinning Table
Lenrie Peter: The Panic of Growing Older
Kofi Awoonor: The Anvil and the Hammer

*Non-African Poetry
Alfred Tennyson: Crossing the Bar
George Herbert: The Pulley
William Blake: The School Boy
William Morris: The Proud King
Robert Frost Birches: Birches
Williams Shakespeare: Shall I compare thee to a Summer’s Day?

Literature in English Syllabus from JAMB

The aim of this 2016/2017 Unified Tertiary Matriculation Examination (UTME) syllabus in Literature in English is to prepare the candidates for the Board’s examination. It is designed to test their achievement of the course objectives, which are to:

– stimulate and sustain their interest in Literature in English;
– create an awareness of the general principles of Literature and functions of language;
– appreciate literary works of all genres and across all cultures;
– apply the knowledge of Literature in English to the analysis of social, political and economic events in the society.

 

TOPICS/CONTENTS/NOTES OBJECTIVES

1. DRAMA

a. Types:
i. Tragedy
ii. Comedy
iii. Tragicomedy
iv. Melodrama
v. Farce
vi. Opera etc.
b. Dramatic Techniques
i. Characterisation
ii. Dialogue
iii. Flashback
iv. Mime
v. Costume
vi. Music/Dance
vii. Decor/scenery
viii. Acts/Scenes
ix. Soliloquy/aside
x. Lighting etc.
c. Interpretation of the Prescribed Texts
i. Theme
ii. Plot
iii. Socio-political context
iv. Setting

Candidates should be able to:
i. identify the various types of drama;
ii. analyse the contents of the various types of drama;
iii. compare and contrast the features of different dramatic types;
iv. demonstrate adequate knowledge of dramatic techniques used in each prescribed text;
v. differentiate between styles of selected playwrights;
vi. determine the theme of any prescribed text;
vii. identify the plot of the play;
viii. apply the lessons of the play to everyday living
ix. identify the spatial and temporal setting of the play.

2. PROSE

a. Types:
i. Fiction
– Novel
– Novella/Novelette
– Short story
ii. Non-fiction
– Biography
– Autobiography
– Memoir
iii. Faction: combination of fact and fiction
b. Narrative Techniques/Devices:
i. Point of view
– Omniscent/Third Person
– First Person
ii. Characterisation
– Round, flat, foil, hero, antihero, etc
iii. Language
c. Textual Analysis
i. Theme
ii. Plot
iii. Setting (Temporal/Spatial)
iv. Socio-political context

Candidates should be able to:
i. differentiate between types of prose;
ii. identify the category that each prescribed text belongs to;
iii. analyse the components of each type of prose;
iv. identify the narrative techniques used in each of the prescribed texts;
v. determine an author’s narrative style;
vi. distinguish between one type of character from another;
vii. determine the thematic pre-occupation of the author of the prescribed text;
viii. indicate the plot of the novel; identify the temporal and spatial setting of the novel.
ix. identify the temporal and spatial setting of the novel
x. relate the prescribed text to real life situations.

3. POETRY

a. Types:
i. Sonnet
ii. Ode
iii. Lyrics
iv. Elegy
v. Ballad
vi. Panegyric
vii. Epic
viii. Blank Verse, etc.
b. Poetic devices
i. Structure
ii. Imagery
iii. Sound(Rhyme/Rhythm, repetition, pun, onomatopoeia, etc.)
iv. Diction
v. Persona
c. Appreciation
i. Thematic preoccupation
ii. Socio-political relevance
iii. Style.

Candidates should be able to:
i. identify different types of poetry;
ii. compare and contrast the features of different poetic types:
iii. determine the devices used by various poets;
iv. show how poetic devices are used for aesthetic effect in each poem;
v. deduce the poet’s preoccupation from the poem;
vi. appraise poetry as an art with moral values;
vii. apply the lessons from the poem to real life situations.

4. GENERAL LITERARY PRINCIPLES

a. Literary terms:
foreshadowing, suspense, theatre, monologue, dialogue, soliloquy, symbolism, protagonist, antagonist, figures of speech, satire, stream of consciousness, synecdoche, metonymy, etc,
in addition to those listed above under the different genres.
b. Literary principles
i. Direct imitation in play;
ii. Versification in drama and poetry;
iii. Narration of people’s experiences;
iv. Achievement of aesthetic value, etc.
c. Relationship between literary terms and principles.

Candidates should be able to:
i. identify literary terms in drama, prose and poetry;
ii. identify the general principles of Literature;
iii. differentiate between literary terms and principles;
iv. use literary terms appropriately.

5. LITERARY APPRECIATION

Unseen passages/extracts from Drama, Prose and Poetry.

Candidates should be able to:
i. determine literary devices used in a given passage/extract;
ii. provide a meaningful inter-pretation of the given passage/extract;
iii. relate the extract to true life experiences.

UTME HARMONIZED PRESCRIBED TEXT BOOKS (LITERATURE IN ENGLISH) 2016-2019

Drama:

African:
i. Frank Ogodo Ogbeche : Harvest of Corruption

Non African:
i. William Shakespeare : Othello

Prose:

African:
i. Amma Darko : Faceless
ii. Bayo Adebowale : Lonely Days

Non-African:
i. Richard Wright : Native Son

Poetry:

African:
i. Birago Diop : Vanity
ii. Gbemisola Adeoti : Ambush
iii. Gabriel Okara : Piano and Drums
iv. Gbanabam Hallowell : The Dining Table
v. Lenrie Peter : The Panic of Growing Older
vi. Kofi Awoonor : The Anvil and the Hammer

Non African:
i. Alfred Tennyson : Crossing the Bar
ii. George Herbert : The Pulley
iii. William Blake : The School Boy
iv. William Morris : The Proud King